Morning has broken like the first morning
Blackbird has spoken like the first bird
Praise for the singing
Praise for the morning
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word
Sweet the rain’s new fall, sunlit from heaven
Like the first dew fall on the first grass
Praise for the sweetness of the wet garden
Sprung in completeness where His feet pass
Mine is the sunlight
Mine is the morning
Born of the One Light Eden saw play
Praise with elation, praise every morning
God’s recreation of the new day
Morning has broken like the first morning
Blackbird has spoken like the first bird
Praise for the singing
Praise for the morning
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word

Some people still associate this hymn with the 1971 recording made by English pop singer Cat Stevens (known since 1978 as Yusuf Islam). It was widely popular in the United States and was rated near the top of several Billboard magazine charts in 1972. The secular attention propelled its use in many folk-style worship services (a practice likely influencing the tradition of including it at our yearly Easter Sunrise service down at the beach).

The hymn invites the singer to share the author’s awareness of the potential of each new day to recall the wonder of the “first morning” at creation. Some of the connections made here are natural and common, such as beginning with daybreak and the biblical tradition of God’s first creation was light (Genesis 1:3). On the other hand, the unanticipated appearance of a “blackbird” injects a somewhat idiosyncratic note before returning to the first stanza’s final line that suggests John 1:1–3.
Glory to God: A Companion, Carl P. Daw, Jr.

You can hear this hymn sung at Kenilworth Union here.