By The Reverend Dr. Katie Snipes Lancaster

Schools around the country are announcing plans for the fall. Every plan, whether all virtual or all in-person or somewhere in-between, has a cost. There is no good or easy way. If you are a parent or student who is struggling with the worry, exhaustion, loss, or weight of these decisions, you are not alone. We are here. Please reach out to your church family. We love you, we trust you, we believe in you.

With uncertainty as our only certainty these days, and constant change as the new normal, I sense within our staff and congregation a renewed longing to be rooted in God who is our rock. That geological metaphor for the divine is an ancient one, one I have long relied upon. Maybe you’ve heard Bill or Jo or I use it before a sermon: “May the words of my mouth and the meditations of all our hearts be holy and acceptable to you, our rock and our redeemer. Amen”—Psalm 19:14. God-as-rock points to the durability and immovability of God. God is always there, steadfast, and unshaken. God-as-rock points to the primordial, timeless, enduring nature of God. God has always been and always will be there. God has overseen times of crisis like this before. God-as-rock means that we are anchored, rooted, stabilized in these days that feel so unmoored.

What this rock metaphor lacks, however, is movement: the dynamic, nimble, and whirlwind work of moving to the tune of the Holy Spirit in the here-and-now. I am deeply grateful for the ways in which Silvi Pirn and Christine Hides have been listening to that divine song of transformation all summer long. They are committed to offering authentic connection, meaningful experience, and rich sacred encounters for children, youth, and families that are limber enough to endure this continued season of change.

We are building a see-saw (as Christine calls it) for the fall that can pivot easily between at-church and online experiences of beloved sacred community. We boldly invite you to participate.

Posted on July 16, 2020