Thursday, April 22, 2021

Katie Snipes Lancaster

Scripture: Micah 6:8
The Lord has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God.

Spiritual Practice: Justice
Justice is a clearly defined priority at Kenilworth Union Church. It is part of our vision: love God and neighbor by doing justice, loving kindness, and walking humbly with the Lord our God. But how might we participate in justice on an ongoing basis? Annie Dillard says, “how we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives” so if we are going to be justice-people, we need sustainable daily practices of justice-seeking action.

In the book “Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption,” Bryan Stevenson writes, “The measure of our character is how we treat the poor, accused, and condemned.” That seems like a tender, truthful place to start in terms of the spiritual practice of justice-seeking. Maybe justice-seeking starts somewhere else for you: widows, the hungry, the unhoused, the lonely, the dismissed, the ill, the bereaved. God calls us to begin where we are, and maybe “begin” is the most important word there.

Who are your justice-seeking mentors? Who are the justice-seeking luminaries in your life? What justice-seeking spirit do you want spoken of in your eulogies or obituaries? Or, in terms of Annie Dillard’s advice, how might you shift the way you spend your everyday life to newly include a commitment to justice (and thus commit to a justice-seeking way of life)?

Daily Prayer
Jesus, we see you tending to the poor, the vulnerable, the forgotten.
We see you pushing the powers-that-be to open their eyes,
We see you, with humility and strength, seeking justice.
Help us to walk in your way, to trust your path, to live your example.
Help us to seek justice as a spiritual practice that shifts and transforms.
Amen.